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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Studies of magnetic susceptibility anistrophy in rocks found in the catalog.

Studies of magnetic susceptibility anistrophy in rocks

Jaswant Singh Rathore

Studies of magnetic susceptibility anistrophy in rocks

by Jaswant Singh Rathore

  • 36 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rocks -- Magnetic properties.,
  • Anisotropy.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Jaswant Singh Rathore.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination206 leaves :
    Number of Pages206
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22072907M

    In general, fabrics in rocks were measured by using two methods: field observations and/or Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) measurements. In the case of weak fabrics that could not be observed in the field (i.e. granitoids), the AMS technique is based on the relationship between magnetic and mineral fabrics in rocks [].Cited by: 3. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and rock magnetic studies have been carried out for the metasedi-mentary rocks in the central Okcheon Metamorphic Belt. The study area is divided into three metamorphic zones: the biotite zone, the garnet zone, and the sillimanite + andalusite zone from southeast to northwest.

      Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and anisotropy of remanence are used primarily to investigate rock fabrics, and allow the interpretation of flow dynamics in dykes, lava flows and pyroclastic deposits, as well as the location of the eruptive vents. The use of palaeomagnetism and rock magnetism to understand volcanic processes Cited by: 7. Magnetic anisotropy measurements are becoming increasingly common to many studies within the different disciplines of geology, involving sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks.A plethora of techniques exists for measuring magnetic anisotropy of by:

    Ongoing research in geological applications is paralleled by studies of the fundamental mineral magnetic phenomena involved. The papers in this book represent the current state of investigations in magnetic anisotropy studies as a discipline that integrates geological interpretations, mineral fabric development, technical advances and rock. Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can then be defined in terms of the susceptibility tensor eigenvalues as Δχ = χ 1 – (χ 2 + χ 3) / 2. Here we define χ 1, χ 2, and χ 3 as the primary (most positive), secondary, and tertiary (least positive) eigenvalues (Fig. 6).Cited by: 8.


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Studies of magnetic susceptibility anistrophy in rocks by Jaswant Singh Rathore Download PDF EPUB FB2

Although the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of rocks first called the attention of scientists because of its possible influence on the direction of the remanent magnetization, it was relatively soon realized that the AMS of a rock is in general too weak to exert a noticeable influence in the paleomagnetic record (e.g., Uyeda et al., ).

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is an important technique which depicts preferred orientation of magnetic minerals in a rock or unconsolidated sediments. Hence the property is used for study of primary structures and rock by: The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is a powerful technique that can be used to explore in detail the mineral fabric of many types of rocks.

In particular, it is well suited to determine mineral fabric of massive, otherwise featureless rocks, like the internal parts of many lava flows and dikes.

There are two predominant causes for the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of rocks and ferrimagnetic minerals: the shape of the magnetic material and crystalline anisotropy.

In general, these factors may operate simultaneously, but in rock magnetism their effects are frequently by: The study of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS, also called magnetic fabric analysis) has become one of the most extensively used techniques in the last decades, in sedimentary, igneous.

The magnetic fabric of rocks and sediments is most commonly characterized in terms of the anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS).

However, alternative methods based on remanent magnetization (measured in the absence of a magnetic field) rather than induced magnetization (measured in the applied field) have distinct advantages for certain geological Cited by: Palaeomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies were carried out on a orogenic gold deposit in Jokisivu, located in the western part of the Pirkanmaa Belt in the Svecofennian domain of southern Finland.

These results are compared wit. Magnetic anisotropy determines the statistical alignment of magnetic minerals in rocks and provides insight into numerous geological processes, from formation to deformation.

While anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has become a synonym for magnetic fabrics, a variety of techniques for measuring anisotropy exist that are mostly based on magnetic remanence, though others also exist.

The low field magnetic susceptibility of a rock (the ratio of magnetization to the applied field or K = M/H) is given by the total contribution of its bulk mineralogy, including paramagnetic (e.g., phyllosilicates, iron-bearing feldspars), diamagnetic (e.g., quartz, calcite) and ferromagnetic (sensu lato; e.g., magnetite, goethite, hematite) by: It is well-established that measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is useful for petrofabric analysis of naturally deformed rocks, even if the rocks are visibly isotropic, and.

Study of the anisotropic properties of magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetizations is an active field of research in paleomagnetism. These studies have important applications in petrofabrics, structural geology, metamorphism, rock magnetism, volcanology, and tectonics. Here we concentrate on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of rocks measured at low magnetic fields, and in particular, on the effects of laboratory heating on the AMS of rocks.

The relationships among magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, finite strain, and progressive deformation have been studied in Permian red shales and slates of the Maritime Alps (southeastern France). These rocks contain deformed reduction spots which serve as finite strain by:   Magnetic susceptibility (in 10 −5 SI) histograms of the main rock groups of the Hatrurim formation and the underlying phosphorite member within the Hatrurim basin.

Some peculiarities of magnetization and demagnetization may be seen in the map of the magnetic susceptibility obtained on a polished surface of a hydrothermally altered HG sample Cited by: 5. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) as a tool has been explored here to investigate the nature of petrofabrics in Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) of west-central Indian region by representative sampling in typical pahoehoe and rubbly pahoehoe.

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been used in various studies related to interpreting the direction of lava flow, some of which have shown ambiguity with regard to the data generated. In this study, we explored an alternative option to support the aforementioned application, using lava flow type igneous rock samples from the Ijen Volcanic Complex, East Java, by: 1.

tures or textures. In contrast, the anisotropy of There is a wealth of literature on the magnetic magnetic susceptibility may be determined rapidly susceptibility of rocks (Hrouda, ; Urrutia­ from a wide range of rocks.

suitably shaped Fucugauchi and Odabchian, ; Zavoyskiy, /88/$File Size: 1MB. The study was focused on Ordovician sedimentary rocks and their anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). The area under study is situated in the Prague Synform, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic.

Sedimentation in the basin began by Ordovician transgression and continued with siliciclastic rocks to Lower Silurian. The Upper Silurian is typical by carbonatic rocks as well as Author: Jan Černý, Rostislav Melichar.

ANISOTROPY OF MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY (AMS) Introduction Important works on the magnetic anisotropy of rocks were carried out during the s and s (Ising, ; Graham, ).

These authors first realized that magnetic methods may be used to characterize the preferred orientation of minerals within the rock Size: 2MB. Anisotropy in the physical and transport properties of crustal rocks is a key influence on crustal evolution and energy resource management.

Data from deep seismic soundings, borehole logging and laboratory measurement all show that the physical properties of the earth are anisotropic.

Such anisotropy generally results from the superposition of fabric development during diagenesis and/or Cited by: 9. Traditionally, magnetic fabrics have been interpreted based on empirical relationships.

For example, AMS has been shown to reflect the macroscopic foliation and lineation in many rocks, i.e., the maximum susceptibility (k 1) indicates lineation, and the minimum susceptibility (k 3) is normal to foliation [8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16].However, the magnetic and mineral fabrics are not always by: 5.

Abstract Geological field, petrographic, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility studies help in understanding the evolutionary history of the Garhwal synform that lies in the western Outer Lesser Himalaya. Orientations of the magnetic susceptibility axes reveal large variations at short distances as a result of superimposed deformation, and predominant stress conditions favorable for normal Cited by: 7.[1] Pore fabric anisotropy is a common feature of many sedimentary rocks.

In this paper we report results from a comparative study on the anisotropy of a porous sandstone (Crab Orchard) using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), acoustic wave velocity and fluid permeability by: Studies of Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy in Rocks.

Author: Rathore, J. S. ISNI: Awarding Body: University of Newcastle upon Tyne Current Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne Date of Award: